People and programs 02/20/2018

In honour of Social Justice Day, we asked our communities to tell us what building social justice through food means to them. Here’s what they said:




 

For the EPIC social justice club at The Local Community Food Centre in Stratford, it's about reframing hunger as a social justice issue.

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Byem and Rachel are both Youth Leaders in the E.A.T. program (Eat! Action! Think!) at Cedar Cottage Neighbourhood House, a Good Food Organization in Vancouver. They work with youth to build food literacy -- for them, building social justice through food means giving more kids the knowledge and skills they need to feel empowered in making healthy food chocies. For Byem, it's also about increasing access to food through gardening. 
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Cedar-Cottage-Neighbourhood-House-EAT-program-Rachel.jpg

To the community members, staff, and volunteers at the Dartmouth North Community Food Centre, it means working towards a future where no one has to choose between paying bills and buying healthy food.  

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Leah and Rob

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Debra Anne

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Vel

Dartmouth-North-CFC-Collette.jpg
Collette

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Kyle

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For the participants in the Kitchen Program at Carrefour Alimentaire Centre-Sud, a Good Food Organization in Montreal, it's about making food affordable to all Canadians.

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For youth in the After School Youth Drop-In program at The Alex Community Food Centre, it's all about using good food to build community and solidarity.  

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We need you at our table. Join us and help build social justice through the power of food.